Other risks

CNH Industrial operates and will continue to operate as a company that is resident in the U.K. for tax purposes, other tax authorities may treat CNH Industrial as being tax resident elsewhere

CNH Industrial is not incorporated in the U.K.; therefore, in order to be resident in the U.K. for tax purposes CNH Industrial’s central management and control must be located (in whole or in part) in the U.K. The test of central management and control is largely a question of fact based on all the circumstances. Nevertheless, the decisions of the U.K. courts and the published practice of Her Majesty’s Revenue & Customs, or HMRC, suggest that CNH Industrial is likely to be regarded as having become U.K.-resident on this basis from the date of its incorporation. This analysis is supported by the competent authority ruling referred to below. Even if CNH Industrial’s “central management and control” is in the U.K., it would not be treated as U.K.-resident if (a) CNH Industrial were concurrently resident in another jurisdiction (applying the tax residence rules of that jurisdiction) which has a double tax treaty with the U.K.; and (b) that tax treaty allocates exclusive residence to that other jurisdiction.

Even if CNH Industrial’s central management and control is in the U.K., CNH Industrial would normally be resident in The Netherlands for Dutch corporate income tax and Dutch dividend withholding tax purposes because CNH Industrial is incorporated in The Netherlands. Nonetheless, the U.K. and Dutch competent authorities have agreed, following a mutual agreement procedure (as contemplated by The Netherlands-U.K. tax treaty), that CNH Industrial will be regarded as solely resident in the U.K. provided that CNH Industrial operates as planned and provides appropriate required evidence to the U.K. and Dutch competent tax authorities. If the facts upon which the competent authorities issued this ruling change over time, this ruling may be withdrawn and in that case The Netherlands may levy corporate income tax on CNH Industrial and impose withholding taxes on dividends distributed by CNH Industrial.

CNH Industrial’s residence for Italian tax purposes is also largely a question of fact based on all the circumstances. For Italian tax purposes, a rebuttable presumption of CNH Industrial’s residence in Italy may apply under Italian legislation. However, CNH Industrial has a management and organizational structure such that CNH Industrial should be deemed resident in the U.K. from the date of its incorporation for purposes of the Italy-U.K. tax treaty. Because this analysis is highly factual and may depend on future changes in CNH Industrial’s management and organizational structure, there can be no assurance that CNH Industrial’s determination of its tax residence will be respected by all relevant tax authorities. Should CNH Industrial be treated as an Italian tax resident, CNH Industrial would be subject to corporate income tax in Italy and may be required to comply with withholding tax on dividends and other distributions (currently at a withholding rate of 26%, subject to any benefits from double taxation treaties or other reliefs or exemptions that may be available to shareholders) and/or reporting obligations under Italian law, which could result in additional costs and expenses.

CNH Industrial, as successor to Fiat Industrial, is jointly liable with FCA for certain obligations

CNH Industrial is successor to Fiat Industrial – a company formed as a result of the demerger of Fiat S.p.A. (which, effective October 12, 2014, was merged into Fiat Chrysler Automobiles N.V., “FCA”) in favor of Fiat Industrial (the “Demerger”). As such, CNH Industrial continues to be liable jointly with FCA for the liabilities of FCA that arose prior to the effective date of the Demerger (January 1, 2011) and were still outstanding at that date (“the Liabilities”). This statutory provision is limited to the value of the net assets transferred to Fiat Industrial in the Demerger and survives until the Liabilities are satisfied in full. Furthermore, CNH Industrial may be responsible jointly with FCA in relation to tax liabilities, even if such tax liabilities exceed the value of the net assets transferred to Fiat Industrial in the Demerger. At December 31, 2014, the outstanding Liabilities amount to approximately $3.5 billion (of which $3.2 billion consists of bonds guaranteed by FCA). CNH Industrial evaluated as extremely remote the risk of FCA’s insolvency and therefore no specific provision has been accrued in respect of the above mentioned potential joint liability. For further information about the Demerger, please refer to Fiat Industrial’s Consolidated Financial Statements at December 31, 2011 and 2012.

The loyalty voting structure may concentrate voting power in a small number of CNH Industrial’s shareholders and such concentration may increase over time

A relatively large proportion of the voting power of CNH Industrial could be concentrated in a relatively small number of shareholders who would have significant influence over the Group. As of December 31, 2014 EXOR S.p.A. had a voting interest in CNH Industrial of approximately 41%.

The loyalty voting structure may affect the liquidity of the CNH Industrial’s common shares and reduce its share price

CNH Industrial’s loyalty voting structure is intended to reward shareholders for maintaining long-term share ownership by granting initial shareholders and persons holding shares continuously for at least three years at any time following the effectiveness of the Merger the option to elect to receive special voting shares. Special voting shares cannot be traded and, immediately prior to the transfer of CNH Industrial’s common shares from the CNH Industrial Loyalty Register, any corresponding special voting shares shall be transferred to CNH Industrial for no consideration (om niet).

This loyalty voting structure is designed to encourage a stable shareholder base and, conversely, it may deter trading by those shareholders who are interested in gaining or retaining special voting shares. Therefore, the loyalty voting structure may reduce liquidity in CNH Industrial’s common shares and adversely affect their trading price.

The loyalty voting structure may prevent or frustrate attempts by CNH Industrial’s shareholders to change CNH Industrial’s management and hinder efforts to acquire a controlling interest in the Group, and the market price of CNH Industrial’s common shares may be lower as a result

The provisions of CNH Industrial’s Articles of Association establishing the loyalty voting structure may make it more difficult for a third party to acquire, or attempt to acquire, control of the Group, even if a change of control is considered favorably by shareholders holding a majority of CNH Industrial’s common shares. As a result of the loyalty voting structure, a relatively large proportion of the voting power of CNH Industrial’s common shares could be concentrated in a relatively small number of shareholders who would have significant influence over the Group. As of December 31, 2014 EXOR S.p.A. had a voting interest in CNH Industrial of approximately 41%. Such shareholders participating in the loyalty voting structure could effectively prevent change of control transactions that may otherwise benefit CNH Industrial’s shareholders.

The loyalty voting structure may also prevent or discourage shareholders’ initiatives aimed at changes in CNH Industrial’s management.